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Connellsville Township in good shape with salt storage

| Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, 12:02 a.m.

The Connellsville Township supervisors will wait a little to see how the weather holds out and how it affects the township's salt supply before contacting CoSTARS about the 2013-14 salt contract.

“We are going to see how the salt supply goes,” Supervisor Tom Cesario said. Supervisors, however, must contact CoSTARS by March 15.

“Right now, we are in good shape,” Cesario said.

Supervisors decided to send a proposal to Hanson Aggregate to lease one of its buildings as a storage facility.

“We'd like to use it to store some of our outdoor equipment,” Cesario said.

The supervisors also decided to look into a proposed sewage ordinance that would affect people who are moving into the township.

“This will pertain to all move-ins and new homes that are built,” Cesario said. If the ordinance is passed, sewage accounts will have to be set up before a structure is occupied.

“They will have to set up these accounts before they take occupancy. That will keep them from coming in six months or so after they move in,” Cesario said.

With regret, the supervisors accepted the resignation of Robert Goodwin from the board of auditors and named Marlene Grenell to the open position.

After receiving inquires about private roads, supervisors reminded residents that the township does not maintain private property.

“The township does not maintain any private roadways,” Cesario said, “We never maintained them.”

In the case of an emergency, he said, supervisors will make arrangements for needed vehicles to get clear passage.

“If there is some type of a medical emergency, we will make sure that emergency vehicles can get through,” he said

Marilyn Forbes is a freelance writer.

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