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Church offers classes on basic, advance computer skills

| Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, 9:01 p.m.

Christian Church of Connellsville, 212 S. Pittsburgh St., is offering free computer classes to the public.

“We try to hold these classes four times a year as an outreach project of the church,” said Ken Metzger, instructor and church member.

Winter classes begin the week of Jan. 28.

“We have enough space in our computer lab to teach up to seven in a class, with more computers being installed soon,” said Metzger.

· “Introduction to Computers” classes will be held 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Mondays on Jan. 28, Feb. 4 and Feb. 11.

Taught by Mandy, Lois and Greg Metzger, the introductory computer course begins with the basics — how to use a mouse; set up an email address; send and receive emails and photos; and search information on the Internet.

· “Office Skills” classes will be held 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays on Jan. 30, Feb. 6 and Feb. 13.

Taught by Mike Prinkey and Ken Metzger, the class aims to train the unemployed or underemployed to get them back into the workforce with new or advance computer skills. Word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software will be taught.

“Many people have been helped by our ‘Intro Class' and have shown a newfound interest and confidence with their computers. So many have been very appreciative for the help they have received from our classes. And through our ‘Office Skills' class, many people realize that they need some computer skills to keep up with today's job market,” said Metzger.

To sign up for classes, call the Rev. Chris Stillwell at 724-628-3802. Seating fills up quickly.

Nancy Henry is a freelance writer.

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