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Artworks Connellsville to host summer art classes for youth

| Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, 9:01 p.m.

Art education is important for the growth and development of children. They use art to express themselves, to experiment and to test the boundaries of their creativity.

“As an excellent stress reliever and coping skill, art plays a huge role in the developmental process and helps to reinforce learned skills and creativity. Here at ArtWorks Connellsville summer art classes were created with those reasons in mind,” said Daniel Cocks, art coordinator at ArtWorks.

The 2013 Summer Art Camp starts off with a two-day workshop, “Use Your Noodle.” Scheduled for July 6 and 13, kids will be able to use all sorts of dried noodles to create anything from jewelry to trains. The first Saturday will consist of making “noodle art,” and the second Saturday will concentrate on painting it.

Scheduled for July 20 and 27, Linda Carson, a bead expert, will teach the art of beading. Kids will have the opportunity to make jewelry, spiders or people out of a variety of small and large beads.

The only one-day workshop this summer will be held Aug. 3. Titled “Blow Your Own Art,” this class will consist of kids using colored blobs of paint and blowing it around with straws to make abstract pictures.

“Remember growing up and making salt dough Christmas ornaments with your family? Well on Aug. 10 and 17, we are offering a two-day workshop where we are going to encourage the sky's the limit attitude on salt dough creations. Will kids want to create little people, jewelry, ornaments? Only time and their imaginations will tell in this class,” said Cocks.

The final Summer Art Camp workshop will be held on Aug. 24 and 31.

Children will be learning “The Art of Papier-Maché.” Kids will get hands-on experience in how to make objects out of paper and a glue-like substance.

“The first day we will create, and the second day we will paint,” Cocks said.

All of the workshops have two times for different age groups, he said. Ages 6-9 will be scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., and ages 10–15 will be scheduled for noon to 2 p.m.

Reservations must be made in advance as class seating is limited.

The two-day workshops are $30 total, which includes all materials. Children are required to attend both days in order that projects can be completed. The one-day workshop, “Blow Your Own Art” is $10.

ArtWorks Connellsville is at 139 W. Crawford Ave. in downtown Connellsville. Visit the website at www.artworksconnellsville.org or call 724-320-6392 for more information.

Nancy Henry is a freelance writer.

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