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Upper Tyrone Sewage Authority retains officers

| Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, 12:17 a.m.

The Upper Tyrone Sewage Authority reorganized this week, retaining the same officers.

Jess Keller will serve as chairman; Paul Kendi, vice chairman; John Schmidt, treasurer; and Jackie Beranek, secretary.

Scott Avolio will remain solicitor at a retainer of $250 a month. Lori Henry will stay on as secretary at a fee of $100 a month. Morris Knowles will remain the authority's engineering firm.

Keller gave an update on where the authority is as far as getting some kind of sewage line installation project throughout the township.

“Right now we're working with Morris Knowles, who is finishing the engineering, and we're hopeful to have the design work done in the near future,” Keller said.

Not much else can be done until funding is approved, he noted.

Last year authority members were told that they were in line for funding through the Department of Agriculture's Rural Development program, which would include $4 million in grant money and more than $2.2 million in low interest loans.

Since then, Rural Development reported the release of money into the grant fund has been stagnant.

“We're hopeful that we will still get money through Rural Development at some point,” Keller said.

Authority members also met with PennVEST to discuss the requirements needed to apply for funding there and plan to send a letter to the Fayette County commissioners requesting $100,000 from the Act 13 natural gas well monies.

Keller said they were told that the sewage treatment plant being built by the Westmoreland Fayette Municipal Sewage Authority is set to go on line in 3 12 years.

“We need to have our lines in and our customers signed up by the time the plant goes,” he said.

Rachel Basinger is a freelance writer.

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