Share This Page

Dunbar Township adds trucks to its fleet

| Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013, 9:01 p.m.
Dunbar Township Supervisor Keith Fordyce, state Rep. Deberah Kula and Dunbar Township Supervisor John Tabaj stand in front of the dump truck that came through the Federal Surplus Property Program with the help of Kula’s office. Rachel Basinger | For the Daily Courier

Dunbar Township supervisors are happy to see two new trucks in their fleet.

While one truck is a brand new 2012 Ford 550, the other truck is 20 years old but was a great find and buy for the township through the Federal Surplus Property Program that state Rep. Deberah Kula referred to the supervisors.

Supervisor Keith Fordyce said they had been looking for a truck and decided to call Kula's office to see if there was any grant money or other programs out there that they might be able to look into.

“I do try to help out when I can,” said Kula. “We're always searching for any type of a program that may be a benefit to the township supervisors or anyone in the district.”

When the supervisors approached her, she said she and her office staff began to search for an easy solution.

“Grants are just not there anymore and the ones that are there are so competitive,” Kula said.

That's when she recommended the supervisors look into the Federal Surplus Property Program.

Fordyce said supervisors found a 1993 dump truck that had just 5,000 miles on it. The township ended up paying just $1,200 for it.

Fordyce said the township had to replace the brakes, check the truck over and give it a paint job, but after all that, the township had about $10,000 in it.

“If this truck were bought brand new, it would have cost at least $70,000,” he said.

“It took a little bit of work, but they got something nice out of it,” said Kula. “The Dunbar Township supervisors aren't afraid to go the extra mile and do the immense amount of paperwork that goes along with this kind of program.”

Supervisor John Tabaj said the new Ford 550 cost about $69,000 and was a budgeted item that is being paid out of the general fund.

“When I came here (in 2007) our trucks were 10 to 12 years old,” he said. “We've been working to try and replace as many as we can.”

In 2009 the township got two new GMC trucks and last year the township bought this Ford 550, which just came in.

Tabaj said supervisors are hoping to buy one or two trucks this year.

“The breakdowns are just killing us, money wise and time wise,” he said. “Especially with winter maintenance. The people depend on that and they want you there yesterday.”

Rachel Basinger is a freelance writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.