Share This Page

After more than 20 years, Uniontown woodworker 'still learning' his craft

| Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Kebin Holbert is the February Artist of the Month. His woodworking items will be displayed through the end of February 2013 in the Law Library of the Fayette County Courthouse in Uniontown. MARILYN FORBES I FOR THE TRIBUNE-REVIEW

The art of woodworking takes patience and craftsmanship, and Kebin Holbert of Uniontown has spent more than 20 years honing his craft.

Holbert is the February Artist of the Month. His work is being featured in the Law Library of the Fayette County Courthouse in Uniontown.

Exhibit director and assistant librarian Barbara Pasqua said that she approached Holbert asking him if he knew of any artists that she could approach about the exhhbit, not realizing that he did woodworking.

“I mentioned to Kebin if he knew of any artists and he said that he worked with wood,” Pasqua said, adding that she wanted him to display some of his finished pieces as she had not featured a woodworker recently. “I try to find something different every month.”

Holbert, who is employed in the IT department at the courthouse, started his hobby several years ago and enjoys the time that he can find to work with the wood.

“I started in the mid '80s” Holbert said. “I wanted to make a secretary desk for my son so I thought I'd give it a try.”

Holbert completed the desk, which started him on the path to his new hobby.

The son of a carpenter, Holbert's natural talent is apparent in the detailing and crafted finished product that he creates.

Working with different wood grains, Holbert frequently opts for a finished product completed with clear coat, choosing to steer clear of stains.

“I enjoy working with cherry and walnut, oak and maple,” Holbert said. “I work mainly with the domestic woods that can be purchased locally.”

Setting up a woodworking area on his property, Holbert said that he has collected an impressive array of tools over the years and plans to continue his hobby.

“It's just something that I really enjoy doing,” Holbert said, adding that he hopes to one day have more time to devote to his craft that he presently only spends a few hours each week perfecting. “I just wish that I had more time. I'm still learning, and I think that I will continue to learn for a long time.”

Making items to be given as gifts or taking orders from friends and family members, Holbert has created several swings, steps, corner pieces, desks and cribs.

“The crib that I made has already been used for three grandchildren already,” Holbert said. “I hope to see it passed down from generation to generation. That is what something like this is all about. Creating something that will be used in my family for many years to come.”

Marilyn Forbes is a freelance writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.