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Fayette woman aims for prothonotary job

| Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
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Frankhouser

A Fayette County woman is running for prothonotary.

Nina Capuzzi Frankhouser is seeking the Democratic nomination for the office in the May 21 primary.

The position is open because the former prothonotary, Lance Winterhalter, quit in the middle of his term. The winner will serve out the remaining two years of Winterhalter's term.

Frankhouser said she has extensive knowledge of county records because she previously worked as an independent abstractor for the gas industry and is employed at the courthouse in the Recorder of Deeds' office.

“Through the past several years, I have gained invaluable knowledge as to the inner workings of the various county offices, not only in the Fayette County Courthouse, but all of the surrounding counties,” Frankhouser said.

If elected, Frankhouser said one area she would try to improve is preservation of historical records in the prothonotary's office, many of which are used by people researching genealogy.

“There are extremely old documents in that building, and I would like to explore options to preserve and have better access to those records,” Frankhouser said.

Frankhouser said she would maintain the “excellent service” the office provides to residents, but at the same time look for ways to enhance efficiency and access to records.

She said she would like to provide greater privacy for people at the office seeking to file requests for protection-from-abuse orders.

Frankhouser is a graduate of Uniontown Area High School and West Virginia University. She lives in South Union with her husband, Gary, and three children.

Liz Zemba is a reporter for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-601-2166 or lzemba@tribweb.com.

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