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New York man gets up to 30-year prison sentence for Redstone bank robbery

| Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

A New York man convicted of robbing a Fayette County bank at gunpoint in 2011 will serve up to 30 years in prison.

Jerod “New York” Jackson, 24, whose last known address was Brooklyn, was convicted of multiple counts of theft, robbery, simple assault and reckless endangerment following a March trial.

State police said Jackson was carrying a black handgun when he entered the Parkvale Bank along Route 40 in Redstone on Aug. 25, 2011, and demanded money.

According to court records, numerous bank employees immediately realized a robbery was imminent and pressed security alert buttons.

Records show Jackson pointed the weapon at several tellers, ordering them to fill a bag with cash. He escaped with more than $11,000, police said.

“Not only did (Jackson) threaten people with a firearm, he put it directly to (a bank employee's) head when committing the robbery,” Senior Judge Ralph Warman said on Monday.

“One victim was unable to return to work. She (remains) in counseling,” Warman said.

“She was 35 weeks pregnant when he put a gun to her head,” said Assistant District Attorney Michelle Kelley.

“There is no question, based on testimony we had at trial, (Jackson) did have a weapon during the commission of this crime,” Warman said.

He sentenced Jackson to serve five to 20 years for one count of robbery with threat of immediate serious injury and a consecutive term of five to 10 years for an identical charge.

Jackson will be taken to SCI Pittsburgh and must serve a minimum of 10 years before being considered for parole.

Warman imposed no further penalty for the remaining charges.

Mary Pickels is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com.

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