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Connellsville Ten Commandments monument battle continues

| Friday, April 26, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
Rachel Basinger | for the Daily Courier
The Rev. Ewing Marietta, with the Thou Shall Not Move organization, recognizes Angela Zimmerlink (right) and the rest of the Fayette County commissioners for their support of the group which is battling to keep the Ten Commandments monument outside of Connellsville Junior High School, where it has stood for more than 50 years.
Rachel Basinger | for the Daily Courier
The Rev. Ewing Marietta, with the Thou Shalt Not Move organization, fighting to keep the Ten Commandments monument at its current location outside of the Connellsville Junior High, recognizes attorney Steven Walton (right) for his help in putting together a lease agreement the organization will use when a monument is erected at any new location.

The Thou Shall Not Move organization, fighting to keep the Ten Commandments monument at its current location outside Connellsville Junior High School, discussed the issues again Wednesday night.

The Rev. Ewing Marietta told those in attendance there has not been any progress on putting the first Ten Commandments stone monument at St. John's Roman Catholic Church along Route 119 in Connellsville.

The organization, with the help of attorney Steven Walton, has put together a lease agreement that will be used between the organization and the property owner where any monument will be placed in the future.

Marietta said they hope to soon announce where and when the first monument will be placed.

The organization recognized both Walton and the Fayette County Commissioners for their support.

Commissioner Angela Zimmerlink, representing the board, commended the group.

“Nothing can be accomplished unless we all work together,” she said. “It only takes a small group of people with keen minds who keep on moving forward. You cannot give up, because that's what they want.”

Walton said that if the organization gets younger Christians behind the movement, it could take off with the help of social media.

Brady Szabo of Connellsville, who owns Szabo Media Services, volunteered to set up a web page for the organization, where anyone wanting to make a donation could do so.

Marietta said they have sold approximately 4,500 Ten Commandments yard signs. Marietta raised the idea of approaching Connellsville Area School Board members at their May 13 meeting, to ask directors to consider offering an English Literature elective course on the Bible, which is available in some curricula.

One high school student, Jared Mucha, said he could probably gather some students to show support for the addition of such an elective.

Marietta reiterated the group's stance that the monument on school district property should not be moved.

“It's just the principle of the thing that someone can come in and say something offends them and then have it moved,” he said. “We need to continue to stand with this.”

Rachel Basinger is a freelance writer.

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