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Drive will help to feed thousands in need

| Saturday, May 4, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Whenever you sit down to your next meal, remember that there are thousands in the Fay-West area who have no idea where their next breakfast or dinner will come from. With this in mind, dozens of Boy Scouts set out in the area to collect bags of food that they then donated to the county food banks.

“The drive was very successful,” said Jack Waite, assistant scout executive for the Westmoreland Fayette Council of the Boy Scouts of America, of the collection held April 27. The Scouts revisited residents where they had left door hangers. “We collected 35,085 pounds of food in Westmoreland and 6,123 pounds of food in Fayette County. We will still do follow-ups to the schools and businesses that are taking part in this for the next few weeks or so.”

The nonperishable food collected was donated to the county food banks to be distributed to area families that are in need.

“The Boy Scouts Scouting for Food Drive is our biggest food drive, and it is of utmost importance in helping to feed over 15,000 people in Westmoreland County, “ said Westmoreland County Food Bank development director Jennifer Miller.

“This year to date we have received over 35,000 pounds of food, and we still have donations coming in from Giant Eagle and local businesses that have supported their efforts by having a collection box in their building.”

Waite added that those who wish to donate can bring food to their local Nationwide Insurance agent, who are all partnering in the drive and in the efforts to help the Boy Scouts.

“This is a great opportunity for the boys to learn at an early age how to help their neighbors,” Waite said.

“A little effort on their part can help a lot of families.”

For information, call the Westmoreland Fayette Council of Boy Scouts of America at 724-837-1630.

Marilyn Forbes is a freelance writer.

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