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Bullskin candidates tackle voters' questions

| Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Voters in Bullskin Township had a chance on Tuesday to question candidates seeking party nominations in the May 21 primary election for supervisor, tax collector and auditor.

The candidates forum was hosted by the Bullskin Township VFD. Questions came from those attending. They were screened before presented to the candidates.

Candidates for Bullskin Township supervisor include David Butler, 60, and Roy Thayer, 55. Both are Democrats. There is one supervisor position open.

Tax collector candidates include incumbent Lou Bell, 59 and Jeff Hann, 39. Both are Democrats. Seeking the Republican nomination are Kylie Carleton, 34 and Ginny Martin, 57.

Those vying for the open seat of auditor include Mick Lilley, 36, and Jeffrey Martucci, 42, both Democrats.

Questions for the candidates covered many areas such as education and qualifications, working relationships with present township supervisors, hiring practices within the township, availability, and the creation of a township zoning board.

Brad Gillott, president of the Bullskin VFD, introduced the candidates. Each candidate was given five minutes to present their platforms. They were given two minutes to answer questions.

Butler and Thayer both said the fire department would have their continued support if elected.

Both candidates said they supported initiatives to bring public water to the Bear Rocks area and other areas of the township. They both said, with further review, may consider the idea of a township zoning board.

Tax collector candidates were questioned if they would be willing to extend office hours.

All candidates said they would consider extending hours into the evening to help those who worked during the day.

Auditor candidates were questioned as to why it was necessary to have an auditor position when the township hires a CPA.

“When you have an auditor in the township, they take the money, the accounts, and the revenues and they should all add up,” Lilley said. “CPAs look at the base numbers but an auditor can say here are the materials, here is what was paid for them and here is what was done with them. An auditor gets more in-depth then a CPA.”

“The job of an auditor is to check the books, balance sheets, expenditures and revenues,” Martucci said. “An auditor follows through and with a CPA you only get the bottom line.”

Marilyn Forbes is a freelance writer.

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