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Connellsville's Golden Reunion

| Sunday, May 26, 2013, 3:12 p.m.
Marilyn Forbes | For the Daily Courier
Enjoying lunch in the sunshine at Connellsville's Golden Reunion on Sunday are Connellville High School graduates Audrey Cavanaugh Crislip, Class of 1948; Gwen Swift Rose, Class of 1950; and Dean Rose, class of 1948.

More than 100 people gathered at East Park on Sunday to rekindle past friendships, enjoy good food and entertainment and to see the recently completed work on the castle and tunnel at the park be dedicated.

The second annual Golden Reunion invited alumni from Connellsville, Geibel, Dunbar, and Immaculate Conception high schools.

It was a day for reminiscing.

“I think that this is wonderful,” Carol DeLeon Trimbath, Connellsville Class of 1958, said. “It's a great way to see and talk to people you graduated with and also people who are older then you and younger then you. It's a great idea.”

The event was catered.

Music was provided by the Wally Gingers Orchestra.

“I think this a wonderful idea,” said Audrey Cavanaugh Crislip of Connellsville.

Crislip is a graduate of Connellsville High School Class of 1948. Since 1958 when her first class reunion was held, she — along with Dean Rose and Sam Brooks — have planned their reunions.

“It's great when someone else does all the work,” Crislip said.

Sunday's Golden Reunion was sponsored by the Fayette County Cultural Trust.

Those in attendance were able to see the recent changes and updates at the park.

A dedication ceremony was held showing off the refurbished East Park castle lookout and tunnel areas. The newly remodeled tennis courts that have been named in honor of Emmett Hicks were also dedicated. Hicks played and taught tennis to area youth for many years.

“When I was growing up, I wanted a tennis racket because I wanted to play tennis,” Corinne Shields of Connellsville said. “Emmett Hicks taught me how to play tennis and he was just great. He helped so many people that I have talked to over the years.”

The courts were refurbished thanks to the generosity and hard work of Jack Trump.

“He taught Jack Trump to play, too,” Shields said of Hicks. “He was great.”

“This is a nice group and a mixture of new and old,” Fayette County Cultural Trust President Michael Edwards said. “We were able to have a nice weekend package with the symposium on Friday and the Geranium Festival yesterday. A lot of people plan trips home for the Memorial Day weekend, so we thought that this was a good time for this.”'

Many who attended last year's Golden Reunion made a return visit. They said the event is an enjoyable afternoon and those who don't take advantage of the reunion are missing out on a great time.

“This is a really wonderful idea, and for those who don't come, it's their loss,” Gwen Swift Rose of Connellsville said.

Marilyn Forbes is a freelance writer.

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