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World War II vets invited to share stories during Connellsville library program

| Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 11:21 a.m.

July might seem like an odd time of the year to think about Pearl Harbor and the entry of the United States into World War II, but Shirley Rosenberger, who works in programming and circulation at the Carnegie Free Library in Connellsville, said the idea of the theme for an adult reading club goes well with the Fourth of July holiday.

“World War II brought about changes in so many ways,” she said. Rosenberger said veterans of World War II were viewed “as heroes,” differently from those of, for example, Vietnam.

On Saturday, beginning at noon, the library's adult reading club will review readings about the war, the people who fought and the changes that happened because of the war.

Several World War II veterans are expected to attend to discuss their perspectives on the war.

The session is open to the public. Rosenberger encourages participation.

“World War II brought about changes in so many different ways,” she said. “Women joined the workforce (Rosie the Riveter), and new technology (atom bomb).”

Rosenberger said talks by the veterans could give those who attend the perspectives of the World War II veterans when they joined the military and their perspectives when they came home.

She is inviting any World War II veterans to join in the program on Saturday, as well as members of the public.

The program should run two hours but could go over.

Rosenberger said the library will be open until 5 p.m.

Karl Polacek is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at kpolacek@tribweb.com or 724-626-3538.

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