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Fundraising walk recalls brother's brave fight

| Saturday, July 27, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

When Colleen Murphy learned her brother Bobby Miller was fighting cancer, she stepped in to comfort him with a listening ear.

It started in his kidney. But after surgeries, the disease took over a lung and finally his brain.

He was 56 when he died.

“He put up a big fight,” Murphy said. “He fought it for six years.”

Over time, Murphy has watched some of her closest friends and family members battle cancer. She is leading a walk around Connellsville on Sunday to raise awareness and funds for cancer research organizations.

The Light the Way Cancer Walk will begin at Central Fellowship Church on North Arch Street, continue down Pittsburgh Street and loop around Crawford Avenue to finish at the church.

Those who would like to walk but cannot make a donation are still encouraged to attend, Murphy said.

Donations will be accepted at the walk. Funds raised will be split between the National Foundation for Cancer Research and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

Murphy will be selling posters for $5 that say, “We're walking in honor of,” to be filled in with a name. The posters will be displayed around the Central Fellowship Church.

“More and more people are being diagnosed with cancer. I just wanted to do something,” Murphy said. “There are a lot of people in Connellsville that have lost loved ones to cancer. I want people to know you didn't lose that person in vain. We're continuing the fight. We can give the funds to people who are working to find a cure.”

Registration will begin at 7 p.m. at the church, with the walk to begin at 8 p.m. Sunday.

Amanda Dolasinski is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-6220 or adolasinski@tribweb.com.

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