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3 of 6 accused Connellsville vandals appear for hearings

| Friday, July 19, 2013, 7:15 a.m.
Evan R. Sanders | Daily Courier
Bernard “BJ” Wires (front to back), 30; Michael Metts, 26; and Timothy Miller, 23, are led from District Judge Ronald Haggerty Jr.'s office on Thursday after their preliminary hearings before acting District Judge Robert Breakiron on charges filed in connection with a vandalism spree that took place in Connellsville on June 24.

Three of the six Connellsville residents accused of damaging an estimated 60 vehicles and a few homes appeared for their preliminary hearings Thursday with one continuance, one waived to court and one having his bond revoked after allegedly threatening one of his codefendants.

Bernard “BJ” Wires, 30, of 1413 S. Pittsburgh St., Michael Metts, 26, and Timothy Miller, 23, both of 314 N. Pittsburgh Street Apt. C, were scheduled to appear before acting District Judge Robert Breakiron at District Court 14-1-02, Connellsville, for their role in a vandalism spree that occurred in the early morning hours of June 24. Also charged in the spree were Tabatha Mitchell, 20, of 225 S. Prospect St., Britany Melissa Cornish, 20, of 321 W. Fayette St., and one 15-year-old male juvenile.

Prior to the hearings, Wires was taken into custody and read his Miranda rights by Connellsville police after he allegedly made threats to one of his codefendants.

Wires, who was free on $25,000 unsecured bond, had his bond revoked by Breakiron, who had set bond at $25,000 monetary. Wires was transported to the Fayette County Prison. A new hearing was not yet scheduled.

The charges against Metts were waived to county court with a formal arraignment scheduled at 9:30 a.m. Aug. 15 in Courtroom 3 of the Fayette County Courthouse.

He is free on $25,000 bond after Breakrion reduced his to an unsecured bond.

The charges against Miller were continued to 1 p.m. July 25 before District Judge Ronald Haggerty Jr. He remains in the Fayette County Prison in lieu of $20,000 bond.

The June 24 rash of vandalism took place across the city, with most of the damage occurring on the South Side, leaving a trail of slashed tires and some property damage totaling approximately $11,910.57.

Both Mitchell and Cornish remain lodged in the Fayette County Prison in lieu of $20,000 each. Their preliminary hearings before Haggerty are scheduled at 11:30 a.m. Aug. 1.

Mark Hofmann is a staff writer with Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-626-3539 or mhofmann@tribweb.com.

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