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Connellsville girl makes 2nd donation to Locks of Love

| Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
Marilyn Forbes | for the Daily Courier
Stylist Beverly Striner cuts through the thick brunette hair of Taylor Cable, 12, who donates her hair for a second time to “Locks of Love.”

When Taylor Cable, 12, of Connellsville decided two years ago that she was tired of her long brown hair and wanted it cut, she not only received a new look but the satisfaction that she was able to help another young person somewhere who needed a little boost.

Cable decided to donate her cut hair to an organization called Locks of Love.

“I had said that I wanted to get my hair cut, and some girls in my Girl Scout troop said about Locks of Love,” Cable said. “So I decided to do it.”

Now the selfless young lady decided to donate a second time when her hair grew out.

“We have been coming on a regular basis to get her hair measured and the ends cut and straightened,” said Linda Howard, her grandmother. “She wanted it to be nice when is was long enough.”

Locks of Love is a public nonprofit organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children in the United States and Canada under age 21 who are suffering from long-term medical hair loss from any diagnosis. The group meets a unique need for children by using donated hair to produce the highest-quality hair prosthetics, according to its website.

Taylor went to Tangles in Connellsville to get her hair cut and donated. Owner Beverly Striner said she has seen a few others over the years come to her establishment to donate.

“I really think that it's a great program,” Striner said of Locks of Love. “It's nice to see people do this.”

Taylor, who is active in Cadet Girl Scout Troop 53101 from Connellsville, earned a special badge for her first time donating and will receive a second badge for participating again.

Taylor said several girls in her troop followed her example and donated their hair.

“A couple girls in my troop said, ‘Hey, I want to do it now,' ” she said.

Taylor will be attending junior high this year, sporting her new look.

“I like it,” she said of her shoulder-length hair.

“”I think that this is a very generous thing for her to do,” Howard said. “It's something that she wanted to do, and it's a really nice way for her to be able to help other kids. I think that it's just great.'

Taylor is the daughter of Kourtney Cable and the late William Cable. Her grandparents are Linda Howard and Sue Harvey.

Marilyn Forbes is a contributing writer.

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