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Painkillers-for-sex deals alleged in South Union

| Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, 8:43 p.m.

A Fayette County man used a cash-advance business as a front for illegal drug sales, according to police, and then filed a private criminal complaint against a customer whose checks bounced.

Richard William Koslick Sr., 60, of 103 Longridge Lane, South Union, sometimes exchanged drugs for sex and forged some customers' post-dated checks for amounts greater than they owed, police said.

When one of the forged checks bounced, Koslick filed a bad-checks criminal complaint against the customer, police said in a complaint filed Thursday before District Judge Joseph George Jr.

Koslick is charged by state police with dealing in proceeds of unlawful activities, theft by extortion, forgery, possession, possession with intent to deliver and unsworn falsification to authorities.

Police said Koslick runs RNG Enterprises out of a side door near his garage on Longridge Lane.

“The business operates under the premise or guidelines of providing a cash advancement for a fee on a personal check,” said Trooper James Monkelis in the complaint. “However, instead, Koslick is selling prescription pills to his drug-addicted customers, as well as obtaining sexual gratification from some.”

One of Koslick's customers told Monkelis that she used checks to buy $2,000 worth of “illegal pills” from Koslick between 2010 and April 2012. She was arrested and jailed briefly when one check bounced and Koslick filed a private criminal complaint for bad checks, the complaint says.

Police said Koslick sold oxycodone and OxyContin from the home-based business.

According to the complaint, customers who borrowed cash told police they were threatened with bad checks charges, even when they paid back the money or made a partial payment.

“Koslick as RNG Enterprises as a business practice requests and accepts checks with no dollar amount documented,” according to the complaint. “Koslick later adds the dollar amount he chooses, regardless of any payments that have been rendered. Several victims reported being threatened with prosecution when they complain after they have already satisfied the debt and are still prosecuted for a private criminal complaint of bad checks.”

One customer borrowed $350 from Koslick in exchange for a signed, blank check. She paid back $160, but when she missed a payment, Koslick filled out her check for $400 and deposited it, police said. When that check bounced, police said, Koslick filed a private criminal complaint for bad checks.

Liz Zemba is a reporter for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-601-2166 or lzemba@tribweb.com.

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