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Dunbar Historical Society expands lore

| Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013, 1:01 a.m.
Dunbar Historical Society’s new book, “Dunbar and Its Neighbors,” is currently being printed.
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Dunbar Historical Society’s new book, “Dunbar and Its Neighbors,” is currently being printed.

A new book compiled by the Dunbar Historical Society has expanded Dunbar lore to include several neighboring towns.

“Dunbar and Its Neighbors” — the historical society's second book — features more than 270 photos, including rare images of Leisenring's World War I parade, H.C. Frick's Leisenring #1 coke ovens and the 1966 Keystone Fireworks explosion.

“Our first book was well received,” said Donna Myers, historical society secretary. “Its sales help to fund several of the historical society's projects.”

Pre-orders for “Dunbar and Its Neighbors” are being collected. The books will be available at the borough's Community Fest on Sept. 28.

The historical society began work on “Dunbar and Its Neighbors” several months ago after receiving requests for a second volume that would include the history of nearby Dunbar Township villages such as Mount Braddock, Leisenring, Morrell, Trotter and Wheeler.

Volume One contained photos with captions and small snippets of Dunbar history. Text was expanded in “Dunbar and Its Neighbors.” Chapter 10 is devoted to stories about the Dunbar area.

“The articles are based on many of the photos in Chapters One through Nine,” Myers said. Included is “Dunbar's Covered Bridge” — which Myers said the historical society had never known about prior to the second book project. “It's always exciting when here-to-fore unknown information comes to light.”

Other titles in Chapter 10 include “The Liberty Powder Company,” “Dunbar: What's In a Name?” “Pascal and the Dunbar Glass” and “How Kingan Hill Got Its Name.”

Assisting Myers with the project was an eager volunteer committee consisting of Becky Hall Kingan, Guy Rose Jr., Diana Homer, Michael J. Bell, Patrick Trimbath, John “Bud” and Bonnie Zurick, Dennis O. Morrison, William Suffern, Jerry Kyslinger and Curt Lehman. Lehman, of Weirton, W.Va., was a proofreader.

“We are grateful to those who so freely contributed stories and we also want to thank everyone who has generously supported the historical society in publishing this encore book,” Myers said.

Laura Szepesi is a contributing writer.

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