Share This Page

Serial thief sentenced to prison term

| Friday, Dec. 6, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

A Fayette County man who twice stole vehicles while fleeing from police will serve as many as 20 years in prison on burglary and theft charges.

Jason Seth Stewart, 46, of Connellsville Township was sentenced on Thursday to 71/2to 20 years for 17 separate incidents, most of which occurred in June in various parts of the county.

In addition, President Judge John F. Wagner Jr. ordered Stewart to pay a total of $41,000 in restitution to numerous victims.

Stewart attributed his actions to a drug addiction.

“I just want to apologize to the victims, Your Honor,” Stewart testified.

They included Connellsville Area School District, Miedel's Restaurant in Connellsville Township, Everson VFW, Cowboy's Place bar in Bullskin, a barbershop in Upper Tyrone and numerous individuals.

Stewart stole cars, ATVs, tools, auto parts and cash, among other items, according to criminal complaints.

In at least two of the incidents, Stewart stole a motorcycle and an ATV while fleeing from police as they attempted to apprehend him, according to criminal complaints.

Stewart ran from officers when they tried to take him into custody on June 17 at an Upper Tyrone residence, according to a criminal complaint. As he was fleeing, Stewart broke into a shed on King's Hill Road and stole a motorcycle, police said.

A few days later, on June 21, troopers were attempting to apprehend Stewart at the Bullskin Sheetz when he fled in a stolen sport utility vehicle. Stewart abandoned the SUV on North Belle View Road but managed to elude officers by stealing an ATV, police said.

Wagner ordered Stewart to undergo drug and alcohol treatment during his incarceration.

Liz Zemba is a reporter for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-601-2166 or lzemba@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.