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Connellsville Township supervisors recognize city police officers

| Sunday, April 13, 2014, 6:33 p.m.

The Connellsville Township supervisors commended four Connellsville City Police officers who investigated a home invasion and aggravated assault incident on Feb. 14 in the township.

Chairman Thomas Cesario said the supervisors presented a certificate of appreciation to each of the officers, who wanted to remain anonymous because they said “they were just doing their jobs.”

Cesario said the certificates of appreciation were presented to the officers in appreciation for their “professionalism, determination and compassion” in the investigation.

“The determined efforts of you and your fellow officers that night resulted in the capture and arrest of the three persons responsible within hours the incident,” the certificate read. “On behalf of the residents of Connellsville Township, we thank you.”

The certificates were signed by Cesario, Vice Chairman Donald Hann, Roadmaster Robert Carson and Secretary/Treasurer Leah Brothers.

“One of our residents who didn't want to be identified was the victim of a home invasion and assault on Feb. 14,” Cesario said. “His daughter was locked in the closet. We have no police department in the township, so we called the Connellsville City Police to see if they could come to make sure the residents were OK.”

The police officers checked on the family members. Within a few hours, Cesario said they had three suspects in custody.

“It was a really bad night, and it was snowing,” he said. “Those police officers were climbing hillsides and doing what they needed to do to track down those men.”

Cesario said the manhunt began in the Francis Avenue and West Crawford Avenue area and extended to South Connellsville.

“This incident demonstrates that the City of Connellsville has a good group of young police officers who are very committed to solving crimes,” Cesario said.

In other business, John Cole asked the supervisors last week if they would consider paving and edging DeMuth Road this summer.

“The road has deteriorated and needs repaved,” Cold said. “The township needs to repair the road to make sure the water goes to the manhole covers. The road is in very bad shape. My neighbors' yards are getting flooded, and something needs to be done to resolve this issue.”

Cesario said the supervisors are in the process of developing a plan to repave and repair township roads this summer.

“We will definitely take a look at the condition of the township roads and see what can be done,” he said

Brothers said the township recently received $78,372.61 in state Liquid Fuel Funds.

Cindy Ekas is a contributing writer.

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