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Check out the POWER Library before taking that trip

| Friday, July 4, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

As we take our vehicles for mini weekend getaways this summer, several of us will ultimately have to take the car for a trip to the mechanic. Before visiting the mechanic, take an online detour and check out POWER Library. Repair information and specifications for more than 35,000 vehicles are available for free from the state's POWER Library, www.powerlibrary.org. And all you need to access the information is your free library card!

• The information in the Auto Repair Reference Center (ARRC) comes from Nichols Publishing, the former publisher of the Chilton auto repair manuals. It has nearly 857,000 drawings and step-by-step photographs, about 99,000 technical services bulletins and recalls, and more than 158,600 wiring diagrams.

The first step in using the ARRC is to choose the year of the vehicle (anything from a 1954 Volkswagen Beetle to a 2014 Mazda 6), then work through the make, model and engine specifications. This valuable resource contains repair information, technical service bulletins, wiring diagrams, maintenance intervals, full specifications, an estimator for labor times and costs, and diagnostic information for most vehicles.

The Care & Repair Tips section provides links for information about caring for and repairing your vehicle, as well as the necessary tools for buying parts and supplies. This section provides information beyond what your mechanic tells you and also can provide information to help you complete basic maintenance issues yourself. Finally, the Troubleshooting tab is a great place to start to diagnose problems with your vehicle. There are several ways you access the POWER Library: Visit directly at www.powerlibrary.org and click on “List All E-Resources” at the top.

POWER Library is an integral part of Information Literacy, a component of the PA Forward initiative of the Pennsylvania Library Association, promoting the value of libraries in the 21st Century. Libraries help all Pennsylvanians learn how to use online resources and current technology to fully participate in a digital society. POWER Library is a service of Commonwealth Libraries, a division of the Pennsylvania Department of Education. It is supported by the taxpayers of Pennsylvania.

For more information on the programs at the Carnegie Free Library in Connellsville, visit www.carnegiefreelib.org. Check out all county websites and Facebook pages for upcoming events and volunteer opportunities.

Casey Sirochman is the director/head librarian of Carnegie Free Library. She can be reached at 299 S. Pittsburgh St., Connellsville, or by calling 724-628-1380.

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