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Reading program reaches final chapter at Connellsville library

| Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, 1:41 a.m.
Mark Hofmann | Trib Total Media
Anthony Domina of Connellsville was one of the 20 participants in the annual summer reading program at the Carnegie Free Library, which had a science theme this year called 'Spark A Reaction.'

The summer reading program at the Carnegie Free Library closed out another successful summer with reading meeting science — fact and fiction.

Approximately 20 children participated in the Spark A Reaction summer reading program at the Carnegie Free Library in Connellsville. The youth met for an hour every Tuesday for eight weeks.

The program was designed to promote reading.

This year's theme was science, said Eileen Beveridge, programing and teen librarian at the Carnegie Free Library.

Each week, a speaker arrives to let the children know a little about the science they're involved with and it even bleeds over into the realm of fiction.

Beveridge said visitors have included had an X-ray technician who brought in a portable lighted board with actual X-rays, a Pennsylvania State Police forensic expert, a session about robotics where the students made their own Lego creations, a representative from the Pittsburgh Paranormal Society who brought along equipment for the children to use and even a representative with The Running Dead zombie run/walk to go over the history of zombies in film and provide information on how to survive a zombie attack.

“That might have been the kids' favorite,” Beveridge said.

Every week, a book is recommended for the children to read, a trivia question is presented and prizes are given out to the children who read the most number of pages every week.

This is the third year Anthony Domina of Connellsville participated in the program. He created a model solar system.

“It's really fun and the projects at the end of the summer are really neat,” he said.

The end of the eight weeks consisted of a pizza party for the children participating. Beveridge said her two helpers, Ashlie Bowser and Gabby Stouffer, working at the library through PIC, a summer-work program, have helped her reach accomplishments with the project.

“I like this program,” said Stouffer. “I see the kids having fun.”

“And they're learning, too,” said Bowser.

Mark Hofmann is a staff writer with Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-626-3539 or mhofmann@tribweb.com.

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