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Connellsville — a model trail town

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Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, 1:21 a.m.
 

“Connellsville is now a model community for other communities across Pennsylvania.”

That's according to Trail Town Program Manager William Prince, explaining how trail towns have grown and how businesses can take advantage of the programs and aid that they offer.

Prince addressed a crowd Tuesday during a Lunch and Learn seminar held at the Connellsville Canteen.

Prince said Connellsville's growth and increased attention to trail usage and users have made the town a prime example of how a trail town can become a success story.

“We have been taking the lessons learned in the Laurel Highlands to new communities across the state,” Prince said.

The Lunch and Learn series is sponsored by the Downtown Connellsville and Connellsville Redevelopment Authority, with assistance from the Seton Hill E-Magnify and Small Business Administration. UPMC Director of Environmental Sustainability Allison Robinson discussed the importance of going green.

“You want to work sustainability into your workplace,” Robinson said. “Environmental sustainability focuses on exposure and risk for future generations.”

Robinson said the UPMC facilities have been focusing on increasing awareness in areas that include resource conservation, waste maintenance, education, waster reduction and diversion, energy management, paper demand reduction and green area initiatives.

Robinson said that there is always room for improvement when trying to create a greener workplace environment and sometimes education and patience could be key factors for businesses.

Prince said that by going greener, a more inviting experience is created for customers.

“You will not only be helping the environment but you will be helping your business as well,” Prince said. “Trail users are more likely to come back if they feel that they have had a welcoming experience.”

Michael Edwards, executive director for the redevelopment authority, said the Lunch and Learn series are educational outlets and also function as a networking experience.

“We choose topics that relevant to helping their businesses,” Edwards said. “This is to help the business community at large. We see a lot of the same people every month but we are also seeing new faces and we are glad to see such interest from the community.”

Marilyn Forbes is a contributing writer.

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