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Burglary suspect caught, bound by neighbor

Rick Boggio once killed a 1,000-pound Kodiak bear with a bow and arrow.

This week, the Derry Township man nabbed a burglary suspect -- with a roll of duct tape.

When Boggio, 43, heard glass breaking at the Barkley Beer Distributor near his home in Bradenville at about 1:15 a.m. Thursday, he went to investigate. Boggio said the business owner, Geano Agostino, is an old friend of his.

Boggio walked the 250 yards across a field and saw a broken window at the distributorship. He said that he then saw a head coming out of it.

Boggio reached in the window and grabbed the suspect, John Malletz Jr.

"Just as I got there, he was about to leave," he said. "I extricated him from the building. I guess you could say I restrained him."

Boggio's son, Dakota, 17, brought along a roll of duct tape, which they used on Malletz.

"We duct-taped his arms behind his back," Boggio said.

Boggio's brother, David, 39, arrived and the four waited for state police.

Malletz, who is in his late 30s, told Boggio several times that he wasn't a bad guy.

"Any chance you'll let me go?" he reportedly asked.

Boggio, who stands about 6 feet 2 inches tall and weighs 210 pounds, reportedly replied: "No. But if you don't shut up you're going to make me mad and I'm going to hit you."

Agostino, 56, said he knew someone was in the building when the alarm company called and told him that "multiple zones went off."

While Agostino said he appreciates the effort, he said Boggio took a big risk.

"I think he put his life in danger. It's one thing to be a good neighbor, but to put yourself that far out on a limb ...," he said. "In this day and age for someone to go that extra mile, he's not your average guy."

Boggio said he's known Agostino for 20 years and has great respect for him.

Malletz almost made off with $6 worth of pennies, Agostino said. "When Rick grabbed him, the pennies went all over the floor," he said.

The five state troopers who answered the call laughed when they arrived.

"Looks like you've got things kind of wrapped up," one remarked to Boggio.

Boggio has had success as a bowhunter during ventures in Alaska. His brother, David, has reportedly hunted snakes in Florida.

The duct tape came in handy when the brothers returned to Boggio's home. He had cut his hand reaching in through broken glass to grab the suspect.

"Between (David) and me, we were going to stitch my fingers," Rick Boggio said. They decided instead to use the duct tape to close the wound.

Malletz, whose address was not reported, has been charged with burglary, possession of an instrument of crime and criminal mischief. He faces a preliminary hearing May 18 before Magisterial District Judge Mark Bilik, of Derry Township.

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