Share This Page

Assistant DA makes run for Fayette common pleas court

| Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, 12:02 a.m.
submitted
Linda Cordaro

An assistant district attorney on Thursday announced her candidacy as a judge for Fayette County Common Pleas Court.

Linda Cordaro, 52, who is the county's child abuse prosecutor, will seek one of two open seats on the court.

Judges Ralph Warman and Gerald Solomon retired last year. Both are now working part time as senior judges.

A registered Democrat, Cordaro will seek both the Republican and Democratic nominations in the May 21 primary.

Cordaro said she has handled thousands of cases during her 18-year legal career, both in private practice and as a prosecutor. She is a principal in the Connellsville law firm Horewitz, Cordaro, Dietz and Miele.

Cordaro has prosecuted more than 100 criminal jury trials, including homicides, kidnappings, rapes, drugs, robberies and white-collar crimes, she said.

For the past two years, she has focused on prosecuting child abuse cases.

“I've developed a particular sensitivity to the youngest, most innocent victims that will enable me to improve the process they have to go through when it comes time for them to face their accuser and testify against their accuser,” Cordaro said Thursday. “I would like to see as many accommodations provided to young victims of sexual assault offenses and violent offenses, as far as the trial process and how it further affects them.”

The courts, she said, have an “immense role” in ensuring families' safety and integrity.

“Our children are our future, but they are vulnerable, and we must protect them from those who wish them harm,” she said in a news release. “The court system should do everything in its power to assure that these societal misfits who hurt children receive the full punishment that their criminal convictions entail.”

In her private practice, Cordaro said, she handles business transactions, real estate matters, family law, estate planning/administration, civil litigation and personal injury cases.

She is involved in a number of community activities, including board membership on the Uniontown Salvation Army and the Health Choices Advisory Board. She is a member of Soroptimist International's Uniontown chapter and previously served on the steering committee of Downtown Connellsville.

Liz Zemba is a reporter for Trib Total Media.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.