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Scottdale man charged with vandalizing Pitt restroom

| Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013, 12:02 a.m.

A Scottdale man is not welcome on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, where he allegedly vandalized a restroom last month.

Robert William King, 55, of 414 Brook St., is charged with causing similar damage at Penn State Fayette, the Eberly Campus, on the same night.

“He cannot return, or he can be arrested on sight,” Dale A. Blasko, chief of the Pitt-Greensburg police department, said on Monday. “This was our first contact with Mr. King, and hopefully, it is our last.”

King, who does not appear to be enrolled in either school, visited both campuses on Dec. 12, causing about $650 worth of damage over several hours, security officers said.

Penn State Fayette security officer Scott Williams confirmed an “incident” is under investigation by state police.

Charges of institutional vandalism and criminal mischief were filed against King with North Union District Judge Wendy Dennis.

In a criminal complaint, Trooper Robert Reitler said graffiti was found on a men's bathroom stall in the Biomedical Building. The graffiti mentioned a specific person, who told police King had issues in the past with that person's father.

During an interview at King's home, Reitler said, King said he “commits similar incidents when he gets angry.”

“He said he was (expletive) off and it was better than committing an act of violence,” Reitler wrote.

Damage from “various ramblings,” scrawled with indelible marker and spray paint, amounted to $500, according to police.

Pitt-Greensburg police filed a summary charge of criminal mischief against King with Hempfield District Judge James Falcon.

Blasko said King was among visitors attending a basketball game in Chambers Hall.

He said several men reported that one of the restroom stalls “had a tremendous amount of writing on the interior.”

Campus police reviewed security video and the graffiti, which led them to contact state police at Uniontown, Blasko said.

“We learned they had a report of a similar complaint. We compared notes,” he said.

Blasko declined to elaborate on the words written with the marker.

Damage was estimated at $150 to repaint the stall.

King faces a preliminary hearing on March 13 before Dennis on the Penn State charges.

He can request a hearing before Falcon to contest the charge, or he can elect to pay a fine.

Mary Pickels is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com.

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