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Mt. Pleasant residents reminded new law affects disposal of electronics

| Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013, 12:02 a.m.

Mt. Pleasant Borough officials were reminded a new law is in effect that affects the disposal of some old electronics.

Because of the law, residents must find a way for disposal of items such as televisions or computers.

But a representative from Shop Demo Depot told council there is an option in the borough for disposal. And it involves recycling.

Kim Giles with Shop Demo Depot, located at the old Cook's Lumber at the bottom of town, addressed the issue with council Monday night.

“I want to make you aware of a new law that affects the disposal of your old televisions and computer monitors,” she said. “If you place them curbside, they will no longer be picked up because the new law forbids landfills to receive these items.”

She discussed the option of recycling these items.

“Shop Demo Depot will take all of your electronics and properly recycle them,” Giles said. “By doing this, you will be helping to save our environment, but more importantly you will be supporting your own community.”

All of the proceeds made from recycling will go back to the community with programs such as, but not limited to, the Emergency Food Bank, Head Start, Early Head Start and many others.

“I am encouraging you tonight to bring in any of your old electronics — anything with a cord — to Shop Demo Depot,” Giles said. “You can drive right in and our staff will sort and bin your electronics for you. It's that easy.”

Councilwoman Cynthia Stevenson said she has explored a number of other routes for recycling these items but this one seems to provide the maximum amount of convenience for residents.

Giles said no electrical items containing Freon will be accepted.

“We're still investigating how to recycle Freon,” Giles said. “We may be able to do it in the near future.”

Stevenson said she thinks this will be a good solution for the borough.

Giles said Shop Demo Depot would pick up bigger items, such as televisions. Call 724-552-0491.

Electronic recycling at the shop is open the same time as the store, which is Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

In other business, council discussed a request from Medic 10 to allow it to trade an ATV Gator for a 1998 Ford ambulance that has 81,000 miles with Norvelt Emergency Medical Services.

Councilman Cory Snyder made a motion to allow the trade.

“I think it's a good deal for us,” he said. “The ambulance is coming fairly stocked and Medic 10 doesn't have a use for a Gator right now.”

Councilman Larry Tate added that Medic 10 officials did the homework on it and had the ambulance checked out.

“All it needs is tires,” he said. “I think this will be a good thing.”

During last month's meeting, council requested the Downtown Business District Authority to lower the price of rent for the glass museum in the In Town Shops.

Stevenson reported that the glass museum did manage to negotiate a deal with the BDA for at least until the end of February.

Rachel Basinger is a freelance writer.

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