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South Greensburg entertains ordinance on live entertainment

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Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, 8:55 p.m.
 

South Greensburg Borough Council is looking to define what types of live entertainment bars and restaurants will and won't be allowed to have in two areas of the community.

Council, which is updating ordinances, expects to discuss the definition more during a meeting on Monday.

President Clentin Martin said this week that he and council wanted to be clear what types of entertainment were approved for Broad Street Extension and Broad Street, where zoning ordinances have been amended.

The proposed live-entertainment definition prohibits “lewd, indecent or immoral entertainment.” The proposal further defines music, drama, comedy, dancing, athletic, animal and disc jockey acts.

With the zoning changes, restaurants and bars on Broad Street and its extension can provide “live entertainment or dancing” for no more than four events in a 30-day period, unless they request approval for additional events from borough officials.

Business owners can request two more events for the 30-day period.

The borough made the first zoning change after Waterworks began operations last year on Broad Street Extension, officials said.

Previous ordinances for Broad Street and Broad Street Extension did not address live entertainment and were not enforced, Martin explained.

“It's to make it fair to everyone,” Martin said of subsequent changes made for Broad Street.

Courtney Palitto, owner of Zo Zo's Pub and Kitchen on Broad Street, said she doubted her business held more than four performances any month.

“I don't have that much of a problem with it,” she said. “They've been really good to us here.”

A message left for the owner of DeGennaro's Restaurant and Lounge on Broad Street was not returned.

In another matter, council members said during this week's meeting that they have made inquiries about whether the community has received all of its share of 2012 earned income tax revenue.

Borough officials believe some residents may have put the wrong code on forms they filed with the taxes, Martin explained.

State Act 32 went into effect last year, changing the way earned income taxes are collected at the local level.

Each county appointed a tax collection agency charged with collecting the taxes directly from employers.

Berkheimer Tax Administrator is the agency collecting the taxes and tax returns for Westmoreland County residents.

Bob Stiles is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-836-6622 or bstiles@tribweb.com.

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