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Trafford councilman Bruno resigns

| Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, 12:02 a.m.

A year after losing his roles as vice president and finance chairman, Frank Bruno is leaving Trafford Council.

Council voted 5-0 at a special meeting Wednesday night to accept his resignation. Bruno and Rita Windsor were absent.

Council is accepting letters of interest from residents through Feb. 15, with the intention of appointing a replacement on Feb. 19.

Bruno, 44, was a power broker during his two-and-a-half terms on council. Handling the finances for most of that time, Bruno led a recovery plan to wipe out nearly $1 million in debt.

But his council colleagues ejected him from the vice presidency and Council President Richard Laird took the finances away from him in March 2012 as they complained that the borough was overspending on construction of a new public-safety building. Council later refinanced its new debts, but estimated the project might cost $600,000 more than the original $2 million loan for it.

Bruno's departure comes three weeks after John Daykon, who now leads the finance committee, rescinded the verbal resignation he offered at a December meeting after the two clashed about a disputed grant to the Trafford Fire Company.

“Being a councilman of Trafford Borough for the last 10 years has truly been an honor, and I am proud to have served such a great community for such a long period of time,” Bruno wrote in a letter to Laird dated Jan. 30. “However, I now find myself conflicted by the change in leadership and direction.”

Chris Foreman is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

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