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Blairsville woman admits involvement in heroin trafficking operation

| Tuesday, July 26, 2016, 9:36 a.m.

A 40-year-old Blairsville woman has admitted her role in a Detroit-based heroin distribution ring.

Kimberly Cassidy of 220 S. Morrow St. pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Johnstown last week to a charge of violating federal narcotics laws, according to U.S. Attorney David J. Hickton.

Cassidy was among about 15 people indicted last summer in a heroin and pain pill distribution ring that operated in Cambria, Indiana and Westmoreland counties.

Cassidy pleaded guilty to one count before U.S District Judge Kim R. Gibson.

Cassidy admitted her participation in the ring that operated from the spring of 2011 until the federal indictment on May 15, 2012.

The FBI alleges Cassidy, along with co-defendants, conspired to distribute and possess with intent to distribute heroin.

Two of the alleged ringleaders, Kenneth Irving “Kane” Carter, 32, of Detroit, and Dewann Jamal “Woods” Macon, 37, of 530 Stoney Run Road, Derry Township, are awaiting trial, according to court records.

During the probe, agents intercepted “hundreds of telephone calls” between the suspects, according to the complaint filed by FBI Special Agent Sandra J. Maier.

Macon worked as a “supervisor” for Carter, contacting others to drive to Detroit to pick up the heroin and deliver it to a “stash house” at 621 Bedford St., Johnstown, according to the FBI.

The drugs would then be prepared and packaged for street sales.

Gibson scheduled Cassidy's sentencing for June 27.

The law provides for a maximum total sentence of 20 years in prison and a fine of $1 million or both.

However, under the federal sentencing guidelines, the actual sentence imposed is based upon the seriousness of the offense and any prior criminal history.

State police and Indiana police were involved in the investigation that led to Cassidy's arrest.

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