Share This Page

Mt. Pleasant man held in fake Rx case

| Saturday, Feb. 23, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

The son of a cleaning woman severely beaten in a Hempfield car dealership by a security guard in 1996 has been charged with conspiring with his mother to make and pass a bogus prescription.

David Bailey, 33, allegedly admitted that he and his mother, Naomi Bailey, 50, both of 283 E. Main St., Mt. Pleasant, printed “out the illegal prescription forms on his computer at his home ... and that he and his mother (would) sell the pills,” according to a criminal complaint filed by Greensburg police.

Authorities confiscated a checkbook from Naomi Bailey that shows “many large cash deposits several times a month,” according to a police affidavit. “Noted on the balance book with some of the deposits was the name ‘David.'”

Authorities further seized $26,067 from Naomi Bailey's PNC bank account this week, after confiscating more than $4,000 from the pair last week, according to police affidavits.

“The funds are believed to be from the proceeds made during the purchase and selling of illegally obtained prescriptions dating back several months,” police wrote.

Though authorities believe the pair passed more than one bogus prescription, they have only charged them directly with passing a fake prescription for Roxicodone, a pain medicine, on Feb. 14 in the Rite Aid on East Pittsburgh Street, police Capt. George Seranko said.

Rite Aid personnel became suspicious and contacted police, who arrived while Naomi Bailey was in the business.

Police confronted her, but she ignored them and tried to quickly walk out of the building, according to court papers. She then said she was picking up the prescription for a friend and was talking to her son on a cellphone while in the store, authorities said.

In addition to the money and checkbook, police have seized the mother and son's cellphones as part of a continuing investigation.

No attorneys have yet been appointed for the pair, according to court records.

On Jan. 16, 1996, Ronald E. Sager repeatedly struck Naomi Bailey over the head with the butt end of a sawed-off shotgun at Star Chevrolet on Route 30. Sager, who said he was under orders from aliens to attack Bailey, is serving a 10-to-24-year sentence at the state prison in Cresson.

Naomi Bailey received what her attorney described as a “substantial settlement” in 2001 when she sued Sager, Ranger Investigations and Security — the company Sager worked for — and the car dealership. The terms of the settlement weren't divulged because of a confidentiality clause.

Neither Star nor Ranger admitted liability.

David Bailey was arraigned on Thursday before Greensburg District Judge James Albert on charges of acquisition by misrepresentation, conspiracy, criminal use of a communication facility — the computer — and dealing in proceeds from illegal activity.

He and his mother, each free on $15,000 unsecured bond, face a preliminary hearing April 4 before Albert.

Bob Stiles is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-836-6622 or bstiles@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.