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Neighbors' complaints lead to Delmont drug charges

| Thursday, March 14, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
Barry Reeger | Tribune-Review
Delmont Police Chief Tim Klobucar looks over more than 5 pounds of marijuana, drug paraphernalia and $3,020 that was confiscated from the home of Diana Lauric, 52, of Delmont during a press conference on Wednesday, March 13, 2013, at the police department.

Neighbors who reported the scent of marijuana led police to arrest a Delmont woman when they found at least 5 pounds of the suspected drug and bags of hashish valued at $12,000 in her apartment.

Diana G. Lauric, 52, of 100 Valley Stream Drive is charged with manufacturing a controlled substance, possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Neighbors had complained to police about suspicious activity and a strong odor of burnt marijuana coming from Apartment 2-E at Valley Stream Apartments, near Old William Penn Highway, according to court documents.Officers could smell marijuana as they entered the foyer of the apartment building, police said. Officers said they entered Lauric's apartment and watched as she opened and closed the door to her bedroom. While it was briefly open, police said they spotted “a tray with numerous glass pipes and baggies and a container with a green leafy substance on the bed.”

When they confronted her, police said Lauric tried to steer the officers away from the door. Police moved her out of the way and entered the bedroom, where they also found four vacuum-packed bags containing a green, leafy substance in pillows.

After police got a search warrant, they seized a safe, $3,020, “well over” 5 pounds of suspected marijuana, bags of suspected hashish, two digital scales and six large water bongs and three glass pipes used to smoke the drugs, Delmont police Chief Tim Klobucar said. Hashish is marijuana that is altered to increase the level of THC, which is the psychoactive ingredient.

Hashish is more potent than marijuana and can have a higher street value, county Detective Anthony Marcocci said.

“Marijuana is common,” Marcocci said. “Hashish, we come across fairly often, but I wouldn't say it's one of our common drugs.”

All of the confiscated items will be sent to the state police crime lab, police said.

“I'm thankful to get this much drugs off the street,” Klobucar said. “This is a substantial amount of marijuana.”Klobucar said the Murrysville Police Department was called to assist. Argos, Murrysville's K-9, detected the scent of marijuana in a safe, he said.

Lauric was released on her own recognizance. A preliminary hearing is set for March 19 in front of Export District Judge Charles Conway.

Amanda Dolasinski is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-6220 or adolasinski@tribweb.com.

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