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Written confession entered into evidence in which Salem Township man admits to threatening trooper

| Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Andrew Lamb Fulton admitted that he made threats against a state police trooper, then went bowling, according to a written confession entered into evidence on Monday.

According to part of the confession read aloud during a preliminary hearing, Fulton allegedly used a pay telephone to leave a message with the threat on a woman's cell phone, who turned it over to police.

After he left the message, Fulton told investigators, he went to Main Bowling Center in Greensburg to bowl.

That was the second threat Fulton is accused of making against state police Trooper David Williams of the Kiski Valley station, according to court records. Washington Township District Judge Jason Buczak ordered Fulton, 29, of Salem Township to stand trial for terroristic threats, retaliation against a witness or victim, harassment and solicitation of criminal threats.

Fulton, who did not speak during the hearing, remains in the Westmoreland County Prison on $100,000 bail. Defense attorney Patricia Elliott entered a not guilty plea on his behalf.

Neither Williams nor the woman were present during the preliminary hearing. Trooper Owen Leonard, who investigated the threats, testified. Williams said “that the voice was Mr. Fulton,” Leonard said. “He called (the woman), she didn't answer, so he left a message on her voice mail. After, he felt it was wrong.”Elliot argued Leonard's testimony was hearsay, but she was overruled by Buczak.She said Fulton did not have a criminal history and felt remorseful. On March 5, police were forwarded a voice mail message from Fulton who requested that a woman either harm or hurt Williams “or that she find someone that could harm/hurt” him, Leonard wrote in an affidavit of probable cause.Fulton allegedly said in the message, “Do what you need to do.” “Try to get back at him.” “Is there any way you can hurt him?” and “Do whatever you need to do or find someone who will.”

The message was not played on Monday.

In February, Fulton was charged with terroristic threats and harassment by state police for a Facebook post that said Fulton wanted to “kill” Williams, according to police. The threats stem from a drug possession charge that Williams filed against Fulton in October, according to police.

A June trial is scheduled in the drug case.

Amanda Dolasinski is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-6220 or adolasinski@tribweb.com.

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