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Council eyes speed bumps for Export

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By Amanda Dolasinski

Published: Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Gerry Hooper worries one day her 85-year-old mother will be struck by a driver racing through her Export neighborhood.

For months, she has pleaded with Export council to do something. Now she has teamed up with Puckety Drive resident Rosann Barr in asking for speed humps. With unanimous support from council, the borough solicitor will investigate options, including speed humps, to deal with the chronic speeders.

“The speeding is out of control,” Hooper said. “It's an accident waiting to happen, and that's what we're trying to prevent.”

Speed humps are longer than speed bumps and typically are made from rubber. They could be the solution, the women said.

The next step isn't clear, but the state won't be involved.

The state Department of Transportation doesn't have jurisdiction, department information specialist Jamie Legenos said.

“Puckety Drive is a local drive owned by Export borough,” she said. “That would be a decision they would make.”

Residents argue that three municipalities technically own the road: Export owns Puckety Drive from its origin at Old William Penn Highway to Route 22, then Murrysville picks it up there to just past Cornerstone Ministries, and Penn Township owns the tail end where the name changes to Boyd Road.

Although Hooper does not live on Puckety Drive, she said she visits her mother there once a week. Her mother enjoys walking along the street for exercise, but it's too dangerous for her to go alone, Hooper said.

Because there are no sidewalks, the women have nearly been clipped several times as they walked along the edge of the road, she said. When Hooper motions to drivers to slow down, she said many respond with an obscene gesture.

Although it's a residential street, many people use it as a shortcut, Barr said.

The borough does not have data on the number of vehicles that travel the road daily. The volume of traffic has steadily increased with the growth of an industrial businesses at the foot of the street and the construction of Cornerstone Ministries at the top of the hill, the women said.

Export council is expected to discuss options at its June meeting.

Amanda Dolasinski is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

 

 
 


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