TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

All female inmates committed to Westmoreland jail to get pregnancy test

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

All female inmates committed to the Westmoreland County Prison will be subjected to a pregnancy test, whether they claim to be with child or not.

Warden John Walton said the new policy is being instituted by the jail's health care provider.

“That's for (the inmate's) well-being,” Walton said during Monday's prison board meeting.

The need for such a policy arose when a female inmate gave corrections officers false information several weeks ago, he said.

“This female came in and told us that she was not pregnant and she wasn't a drug user,” Walton said.

He declined to identify the inmate, who was found to be pregnant and addicted to drugs.

Since Jan. 1, 27 female inmates admitted to the jail were pregnant, Walton said after the meeting. That number constitutes 4 percent of the 661 female commitments through the first nine months of 2013.

When a pregnant woman who is addicted to drugs is lodged in the Westmoreland County Prison, she is immediately taken to Magee-Womens Hospital in Pittsburgh for treatment.

Walton said that because of the “danger to the fetus,” inmates spend three days in the hospital being weaned off drugs or starting methadone treatment.

It's a “costly thing” because of the round-the-clock supervision required by sheriff's deputies when an inmate is hospitalized, Walton said.

“(The sheriff) has to provide that manpower, which most of the time is overtime,” he said.

Pregnant inmates who are not addicted to drugs receive obstetrics care through the prison's contracted health care provider.

Renatta Signorini is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-837-5374 or rsignorini@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Westmoreland

  1. Last option for former Jeannette Glass site: Pa. Supreme Court
  2. Jeannette man arrested in city shooting
  3. Hole in North Huntingdon dance studio believed to be from car crash
  4. Hempfield library programs at risk as funds dip
  5. Hempfield joins county land bank
  6. $200K grant will go toward demolition at Monsour Medical site
  7. McKeesport man ordered to trial in New Stanton hotel homicide
  8. Police identify Acme man who died after crash
  9. Jeannette father accused of putting loaded gun in daughter’s boyfriend’s mouth
  10. Kecksburg celebrates its UFO history with annual festival
  11. Traffic detour lifted