TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

WCCC's ShaleNET natural gas job training program receives national award

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

Westmoreland County Community College's ShaleNET natural gas job training program was honored recently with a national award, a school official told trustees on Wednesday.

WCCC received a 2013 Exemplary Program Award for nine-credit programs from the National Council for Workforce Education. The council is an affiliate of the American Association of Community Colleges.

Pat Gerity, WCCC's vice president of continuing education, workforce and community development, said he accepted the award in Milwaukee last week. He presented the small clear and blue glass etched statue to trustees at their monthly meeting.

WCCC was chosen from nine finalists for the award that especially recognized ShaleNET's innovation and partnerships with industry, Gerity said.

“We were a community college that stepped up to make an impact with a new industry,” Gerity said.

In 2010, WCCC led a consortium of educators and industry members to form ShaleNET, a program funded by a Department of Labor grant to train workers for a variety of entry-level jobs in the natural gas industry.

Students take courses in areas such as roustabout, floor hand and commercial driver's license.

Last fall, the college partnered with Pennsylvania College of Technology in Williamsport for a second phase of ShaleNET funding that enabled the program to expand, develop a hybrid classroom and online curriculum, and create “stackable” credentials, putting students on a fast track to earn an associate's or bachelor's degree.

“This grant and (program officials') efforts really positioned WCCC in a leadership position,” WCCC President Daniel Obara said.

The program trained 978 students with 20 training providers in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and New York from July 2010 through June.

ShaleNET placed graduates with more than 125 employers throughout the United States, according to the program's description in the award program.

Kari Andren is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-850-2856 or kandren@tribweb.com.

Add Kari Andren to your Google+ circles.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Westmoreland

  1. Police officer taking job in Harmarville
  2. Latrobe police to host National Night Out
  3. McKeesport man ordered to trial in New Stanton hotel homicide
  4. Jeannette man arrested in city shooting
  5. Kecksburg celebrates its UFO history with annual festival
  6. Last option for former Jeannette Glass site: Pa. Supreme Court
  7. $200K grant will go toward demolition at Monsour Medical site
  8. Hempfield joins county land bank
  9. Hempfield library programs at risk as funds dip
  10. Hole in North Huntingdon dance studio believed to be from car crash
  11. Police identify Acme man who died after crash