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Robber didn't let closed North Huntingdon bank stop him, police say

| Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

A Greensburg man arrested on Jan. 15 in the robbery of the PNC Bank in North Huntingdon reportedly told officers he was planning to rob a nearby Dollar Bank but found it had closed when he arrived before 5 p.m.

Township police Detective William Henderson on Friday formally charged Frederic G. Trunzo Jr., 47, of Greensburg with another felony complaint of robbery involving threat of potential injury in connection with robberies at the Dollar Bank along Magill Drive on Dec. 9 and the Jan. 15 robbery at the PNC Bank on Norwin Avenue.

Henderson noted the two banks are just 422 feet apart. After finding the doors locked at Dollar Bank, Trunzo set his sights on the PNC Bank branch, the detective said.

“What bank is closed at 4:30 p.m.?” Henderson quoted Trunzo as telling officers after his arrest.

Trunzo was arrested shortly after that robbery and a police chase and off-road search. During police questioning, he allegedly admitted to the Dollar Bank robbery.

Police say Trunzo passed a note to a teller at PNC Bank in the Norwin Hills shopping center along Route 30 asking the employee to fill his gym bag with money. He left with an undisclosed amount and sped off in a sedan, which police spotted and chased on Route 30 east.

During the pursuit, Trunzo attempted to ram North Huntingdon police cruisers three times, according to police reports.

Henderson wrote in the affidavit that Trunzo repeatedly complained to officers about how quickly they arrived.

“He stated several times that he could not believe that the police had arrived there so fast he could not get away,” Henderson wrote in the affidavit.

No police cars were damaged during the pursuit, but Trunzo struck a civilian's vehicle with his 2012 Chevrolet Impala, according to police. The occupant of that car was not hurt, police said.

Trunzo eventually turned off busy Route 30 onto Ronda Court, where he wrecked in a field behind the Holiday Inn Express, Henderson said. Officers caught him in a wooded area near a housing-plan retention pond.

Police said Trunzo was carrying a switchblade when he was taken into custody.

Henderson said officers discovered in Trunzo's pants pocket a handwritten note he had passed to the teller when he robbed the PNC Bank.

“THIS IS A ROBBERY GIVE ME ALL 100s, 50s, 20s, 10s. NO DYE PACKS. NO GPS. NO FUNNY BUSINESS,” Trunzo wrote in the note, Henderson said.

Trunzo had been charged with aggravated assault, receiving stolen property, theft, robbery, fleeing and eluding and driving without a license. He is in the county jail, having failed to post $205,000 bail set by District Judge Douglas Weimer pending a preliminary hearing on Wednesday.

Paul Peirce is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-850-2860 or ppeirce@tribweb.com.

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