Share This Page

Mt. Pleasant Glass Museum to be part of documentary

| Monday, Feb. 10, 2014, 12:48 p.m.
Marilyn Forbes | for the Daily Courier
Mt. Pleasant Glass Museum board member Harley Trice (left) shows WQED producer Rick Sebak and cameraman Frank Caloiero a few of the more interesting objects in the museum for consideration in his new documentary.

“When I answered my cellphone and heard who it was, I couldn't believe it,” Cassandra Vivian said of the call from Rick Sebak, producer of WQED'S “It's Pittsburgh & a Lot of Other Stuff.” “Then I heard why he was calling, and I got really excited.”

Vivian, president of the Mt. Pleasant Glass Museum board of directors, was contacted because Sebak wants to include the museum in a documentary he is developing for WQED.

“It's a new show called ‘A History of Pittsburgh in 17 Objects,' ” Sebak explained. “The idea is to focus on one object that will be considered the showpiece of the museum.”

Sebak plans to visit 17 locations around Southwestern Pennsylvania to film for his program, which he plans to have ready to air in the spring.

Other objects to be included in the show will be a trolley and powder horn, with many more to come.

“I don't really know until I get there,” Sebak said of the object that will be focused on at any particular museum. “For instance, we are here, and I don't know what the object will be yet.”

Glass Museum board member Harley Trice showed Sebak and cameraman Frank Caloiero several different objects for consideration, telling them the history of each.

“There are a lot of different things here, and everything has a story,” Trice said.

Vivian said the museum recently joined the Laurel Highlands Visitors Bureau, and it was on YouTube that Sebak saw the museum and got the idea to include it in his show.

“Seth (Prentice of Armstrong) filmed the museum, and I gave a copy of the video to the Visitors Bureau, and they put it on YouTube and their website and Rick saw it,” Vivian said. “This is really exciting for us.”

Sebak said he is concentrating on the smaller museums in the area, wanting to highlight some of the true history of the region.

“I love this place,” Sebak said of the Mt. Pleasant Glass Museum. “This place is exactly the right size. You can come in, look at some cool stuff, learn a little bit and move on. These are the types of museums that are the true flavor of our region.”

The show will be a one-hour program, with the Mt. Pleasant Glass Museum piece lasting a few minutes, but Vivian is thrilled to have the exposure.

“This museum was meant to be. It was meant to be open,” Vivian said. “Everything just worked out. We had just one good thing after another happen, and that is how it should be when something is meant to be.”

Marilyn Forbes is a contributing writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.