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Latrobe council OKs raises for city employees

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Friday, Feb. 14, 2014, 3:33 p.m.

Latrobe council approved a 2 percent raise for each of its non-union city employees.

The measure, the same as 2013, was approved unanimously at Monday's meeting through an annual ordinance that establishes the salaries of the employees who are not a part of the collective bargaining agreement.

Included are the salaries of city manager Alex Graziani at $81,671; police chief James Bumar, $80,381; public works director Joe Bush, $67,500; code officer Ann Powell, $39,936; and fire Chief John Brasile, $4,998.

Graziani said he corrected a $708 discrepancy in the budget for Bush's salary, which originally was written as a 1.8 percent raise.

Pay and benefits for all city 39 full- and part-time employees account for 55 percent of the city's $5.2 million budget for 2014.

Wages and benefits will cost the city $2.87 million this year.

The staff salaries will increase by 2.7 percent over the 2013 budgeted amount, according to documents prepared by Graziani.

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