Share This Page

Westmoreland County Courthouse in Greensburg to be featured in TV series

| Monday, March 10, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
The inside of the dome at the Westmoreland County Courthouse on March 6, 2014.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
The rotunda at the Westmoreland County Courthouse on March 6, 2014.

In the 1900s, visitors to Westmoreland County's courthouse stepped in to see a grand staircase that splits into two spirals.

A gaze up to the top of those staircases, carpeted in deep red, took in the century-old Greensburg structure's intricately detailed dome ceiling.

While the main entrance in later years shifted to a different location, the original portion of the building remains a favorite feature that visitors pause to appreciate.

“I think it's a very impressive entranceway,” said Commissioner R. Tyler Courtney. “It's just beautiful, so majestic.”

The four-story granite courthouse and its marble-covered interior will be featured on the Pennsylvania Cable Network in 2015 as part of a series featuring county courthouses from across the state.

Courtney nominated Westmoreland County in January and recently learned the building has been chosen for an episode next year.

“I'm very proud of the courthouse,” Courtney said. “I think it symbolizes Westmoreland County.”

Part-time county employee Myrna McCloskey, who has been conducting tours of the courthouse since 1979, will show the camera crews around. The original portion of the complex is her favorite.

“The architecture's just fantastic,” she said.

Built in 1906, the courthouse has an Italian Renaissance-style dome topped with an American flag. The interior of the dome is painted with floral arabesques and gold leaf.

Walls and ceilings in the rotunda are adorned with Renaissance-patterned mosaics and globular chandeliers.

Each of the nine courtrooms — four are original — are decorated differently, some with similar artistry as the dome ceiling and others with oak paneling and oil portraits. The original structure, built for $1.6 million, was restored in 1980 at a cost of $6.8 million, according to the county's application for the PCN program.

The original structure contains offices pertaining to the court system. An annex building, dedicated in 1979, houses county offices for many departments, including the commissioners, attorneys, Register of Wills, Prothonotary and Recorder of Deeds.

The main entrance is now through the annex building. The original entry is closed.

Renatta Signorini is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-837-5374 or rsignorini@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.