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Penn-Trafford board promotes Inglese

| Monday, March 10, 2014, 11:24 p.m.

Scott Inglese, a longtime educator and a district graduate, will serve as Penn-Trafford School District's assistant superintendent beginning in July.

School directors on Monday unanimously approved a three-year contract for Inglese with a yearly salary of $128,145. Inglese works as the district's high school principal, a role he'll continue until July 1.

Board members met his appointment with applause.

Inglese will work alongside Superintendent Matt Harris, who began the district's top leadership role last month after a stint as interim superintendent. Harris previously had served as assistant superintendent.

The two will make a “very invested” team, board President Toni Ising said.

“Both of them rose to the occasion,” she said.

Inglese lauded his high school staff.

“Without them … I wouldn't be where I'm at. It's been a team effort, and I thank everybody,” Inglese said. “I think we're going to make a great team. I've got a great group of administrators here.”

Inglese graduated from Penn-Trafford in 1985, then worked as a science teacher in Virginia before returning to his alma mater to teach. He then served as assistant principal of Ligonier Valley High School and at Greater Latrobe High School.

In 2001, he returned to Penn-Trafford High School as principal.

During his time at the high school, he increased offerings of advanced courses. Now, the high school offers 24 “college-in-high-school” classes, as opposed to four when Inglese began. Advanced Placement course offerings have doubled under his tenure.

“Scott was highly visible at the high school,” Harris said.

In addition to updating curriculum and the teacher evaluation process, Inglese will help to oversee a $32 million renovation at the high school.

The project will include $429,780 to buy 390 Apple MacBook Air laptops for the high school. School board members unanimously approved the expense on Monday.

The computers will be divided among 30 carts, which can be shuttled among high school classrooms for student use, Inglese said. That will eliminate the need for a few current high school computer labs, so those unneeded computers will be provided to elementary school students.

Administrators will employ a two-year buyback program with Apple, ensuring the school's technology can be updated more frequently, Inglese said.

Rossilynne Skena Culgan is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-6646 or rskena@tribweb.com.

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