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Penn Township man pleads guilty to assaulting 3 police officers

Renatta Signorini
| Thursday, May 21, 2015, 11:03 p.m.

A Penn Township man blamed alcohol for his assault of three police officers in October.

“I was really intoxicated,” said Jordan T. Cosgrove, 24. “I didn't mean to do the things that I done.”

“I'm ashamed of myself,” he told Judge Christopher Feliciani. “I embarrassed my family, and I'm terribly sorry.”

Cosgrove entered a guilty plea Thursday to 17 counts against him, including aggravated assault and disarming an officer. He was sentenced to eight to 23 months in the Westmoreland County jail, followed by seven years of probation.

Penn Township police were called to Cosgrove's home on Aspen Drive at 2 a.m. on Oct. 2 for a reported domestic argument.

Upon arrival, Cosgrove was arguing inside with a woman and became verbally and physically abusive toward the three officers, police wrote in court papers.

Cosgrove threatened to kill and burn down the homes of two of the officers and attempted to remove one officer's duty weapon from its holster. The officers suffered various minor injuries during the scuffle, including cuts and a dislocated thumb.

Cosgrove suffered a cut lip as officers subdued him and began spitting blood on them and inside the police cruiser, according to court papers. He attempted to crawl through the security partition separating the front and rear seats of the police cruiser, police said.

Prosecutors requested a sentence of two years' imprisonment.

Cosgrove wore yellow prison garb to his hearing, which indicates that an inmate is being disciplined.

Cosgrove told Feliciani that he has gotten in a few fights during his eight months in jail, most recently defending himself over a pizza.

“I need a second chance,” he pleaded before sentencing.

Feliciani ordered that Cosgrove complete an anger management course and undergo a drug and alcohol evaluation.

“This is a very serious offense that you've committed here,” Feliciani said. “I'm going to give you a chance to redeem yourself.”

Another requirement is that Cosgrove attend Alcoholics Anonymous meetings at least five times weekly, the judge ordered, calling that the “most important” piece of the sentence.

“You have to go to AA meetings,” Feliciani said. “You have to take things seriously.”

Cosgrove pleaded guilty to three counts of aggravated assault, terroristic threats, obstruction of justice, reckless endangerment, simple assault, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct, criminal mischief, institutional vandalism and attempting to disarm a law enforcement officer.

Renatta Signorini is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-837-5374 or rsignorini@tribweb.com.

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