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Doctor guided by strong morality, compassion

| Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
Dr. James Edward Levin of Sewickley died on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013.

As the chief medical information officer for Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Dr. James Levin monitored and approved the technology that best benefited patients.

“I've always considered Dr. Levin as a moral compass who was precise and unflappable when it came to discharging his duties,” said Dr. Steven G. Docimo, Children's chief medical officer.

Dr. James Edward Levin of Sewickley died of a heart attack on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. He was 55.

Docimo said Dr. Levin had a worldwide reputation in his field, working to reduce the risk of medical errors.

“Yet you would never know it,” Docimo said. “He never sought credit for all his accomplishments.”

Dr. Levin's wife said he had a strong sense of morality and was committed to his family and faith.

“Jim loved his home and his family,” said Regina Schultz Levin. “He enjoyed to be home and watch the sunset from our deck.”

A member of Temple Ohav Shalom in McCandless, Dr. Levin served on the board, was the temple's webmaster and coordinated temple activities.

He exhibited a robust compassion for abandoned animals, his wife said. “Jim and I were involved with a dog rescue group, where we would find abandoned dogs and try to find homes for them.”

Born in Kalamazoo, Mich., and raised in Cincinnati, Dr. Levin was one of four children of chemist Robert H. Levin and his wife, Rae Edelstein, an audiologist.

He earned a bachelor's degree in biochemical sciences from Prince-ton University in 1980, a doctorate in genetics in 1987 and his medical degree in 1988, both from the University of Chicago.

Dr. Levin completed his residency in pediatrics at the University of Chicago in 1991; and from 1991-94, he completed a research fellowship in health education and a medical fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Minnesota.

In addition to his wife, Regina, Dr. Levin is survived by his children, Hannah and Jonah Levin, both of Sewickley, and his siblings, Leslie Stulberg of Chicago and Judith Schechter and Richard Levin, both of Cincinnati.

He was preceded in death by his parents.

Services are scheduled for 2 p.m. Thursday in Temple Ohav Shalom, 8400 Thompson Run Road, in McCandless. Interment will be in Beth Shalom Cemetery.

Arrangements are being handled by Ralph Schugar Chapel in Shady-side.

Jerry Vondas is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7823 or jvondas@tribweb.com.

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