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Community leader energized by faith, tradition

| Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, 8:45 p.m.

Evelyn Glick Bloom's “can-do” attitude took her to the forefront of her generation.

After receiving her degree in chemistry from the Pennsylvania College for Women, now Chatham University, Evelyn Glick was hired to do research in mass spectrometry at the male-dominated U.S. Bureau of Mines in Oakdale.

“It never fazed her that there were no bathroom facilities for women and that she had to have a male escort keep out the males when she was using their bathroom facilities,” said her daughter, Shanen Bloom Werber of Israel.

“But that was my mother, a community leader and an activist with a ‘can-do' attitude, which she passed on to her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren,” Werber said.

Evelyn Glick Bloom of Squirrel Hill died on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, in LifeCare Wilkinsburg. She was 89.

Mrs. Bloom moved to Squirrel Hill in 1951 with her husband, Albert Bloom, founding editor of The Jewish Chronicle of Pittsburgh. They served in numerous organizations geared to improving the quality of life in the Squirrel Hill community.

“My mother also had the distinction of being the granddaughter of Joseph Zelig Glick, who established the first Yiddish newspaper west of the Alleghenies,” said her daughter.

The newspaper was established in 1910 in Pittsburgh.

Born and raised in Oakland, Evelyn Glick was one of two children of printer Samuel Glick and his wife, Anna Glick.

After graduating from Schenley High School in Oakland, Evelyn Glick enrolled in the Pennsylvania College for Women.

Mrs. Bloom served as a volunteer with Hillel Academy in Squirrel Hill, where she sought grants and served in programming, fundraising and officer roles.

She established Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops for children who observe the Jewish Sabbath throughout the Pittsburgh area, said Werber.

Mrs. Glick was a founder of the Israel Film Festival.

She was named Betty Crocker National Homemaker of the Week, and over national radio, she explained kosher eating and Chinese recipes.

In addition to her daughter, Shanen, Mrs. Bloom is survived by her children, Dov Bloom of Israel, Dr. Elana Bloom of Squirrel Hill and Michael Bloom of Arlington, Va., 10 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

Mrs. Bloom is buried in Israel. She was preceded in death by her husband, Albert Bloom, whom she married in 1946.

A celebration of her life is scheduled at 10 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, at Hillel Academy, 5685 Beacon St., Squirrel Hill.

Jerry Vondas is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7823 or jvondas@tribweb.com.

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