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Maj. Thomas C. 'Tom' Griffin: Doolittle Raider WWII veteran helped lift American morale

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By The Associated Press

Published: Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013, 8:51 p.m.

CINCINNATI — Maj. Thomas C. “Tom” Griffin, a B-25 bomber navigator in the audacious Doolittle's Raid attack on mainland Japan during World War II, has died.

His death at 96 leaves four surviving Raiders.

Griffin passed away Tuesday in a veterans nursing home in northern Kentucky. He was among the 80 original volunteers for the daring April 18, 1942, mission. When they began training, they were told only it would be “extremely hazardous,” coming in the aftermath of Japan's devastating attack on Pearl Harbor and a string of other Japanese military successes.

“We needed to hit back,” Griffin said in an interview a year ago in his suburban Cincinnati home. The attack on Tokyo, with a risky launch of 16 land-based bombers at sea from an aircraft carrier, shocked the Japanese and was credited with providing a major lift to American morale.

The planes lacked fuel to reach safe bases after dropping their bombs. Griffin parachuted over China after the attack, eluded Japanese capture, and returned to action in bombing runs from North Africa before being shot down in 1943 and spending nearly two years in a German prison camp.

Griffin died less than two months from what will be the Raiders' final annual reunion, April 17-21 in Fort Walton Beach, in the Florida Panhandle where the Raiders trained for the attack.

“We kind of expected it, because he had gone downhill pretty quickly the last few weeks, but you can never really prepare yourself for when one of these guys goes,” said Tom Casey, manager of the Doolittle Raiders Association.

Griffin took part in last year's 70th reunion at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force near Dayton, which included survivors and relatives of the USS Hornet carrier and Chinese villagers who helped the Raiders elude capture. Eight Raiders were captured, and three were executed. A fourth died in captivity. Villagers suspected of hiding the Americans were executed.

“We had a lot of near-misses, when they (Japanese soldiers) raided places we had been the night before,” recalled Griffin, who had parachuted into a tree without major injury. Three Raiders died off China after the raid.

 

 
 


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