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Philanthropist was Polish maid who wed into J&J fortune

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By Bloomberg News
Wednesday, April 3, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
 

Barbara Piasecka Johnson, a former chambermaid who married into the Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical family and walked away with part of its epic fortune following a bitterly contested battle over her husband's will, has died. She was 76.

She passed away on April 1 in Poland following a long illness, according to her office, BPJ Holdings, in Princeton, N.J. One of the world's richest women, she was a longtime resident of Monaco.

The Polish-born Johnson, known as Basia, in 1971 became the third wife of J. Seward Johnson, a son of J&J co-founder Robert Wood Johnson and a director of the New Brunswick, N.J.- based company for 50 years. She was 34; he was 76 and left his marriage of 32 years to be with her. They met in 1968, when she began work in his New Jersey home as a cook and chambermaid, according to an account in People magazine.

J. Seward Johnson's death in 1983 sparked a legal battle in Surrogate's Court in Manhattan, between his six grown children and his widow over his will, which left her the bulk of his $500 million estate. In a 17-week trial in 1986 involving more than 200 lawyers, the children alleged that Barbara Johnson had coerced her dying husband into changing his will to her benefit, according to a New York Times account.

Barbara Johnson insisted her husband's children were blaming her for family rifts that predated her arrival.

“I'm very sorry these children are ridiculing their father,” she said during the trial, according to People. “They were out of the will long before I came to this country.”

The two sides reached a settlement that awarded $350 million to Barbara Johnson and the rest to the children and to Harbor Branch, the oceanographic institute in Fort Pierce, Fla., that J. Seward Johnson had helped create.

Johnson resettled in Monaco and became an art collector and philanthropist. In March, Forbes magazine estimated her net worth to be $3.6 billion, making her one of the 50 richest women in the world.

In 2004, Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein, founder of Vienna's Liechtenstein Museum, paid $36.7 million for a Florentine cabinet auctioned in London by Johnson, the most expensive piece of furniture ever sold at auction. Made of ebony, gilt-bronze and precious stones, the so-called Badminton cabinet was originally crafted for Henry Somerset, the third Duke of Beaufort, by the Grand Ducal workshops in Florence in the 18th century.

In 2009, Johnson sold Rembrandt's 1658 “Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo” for a record $32.9 million to Las Vegas casino developer Steve Wynn.

In 1990, Johnson said she might spend as much as $100 million to revive the Gdansk Shipyard in Poland, which a decade earlier had spawned the Solidarity resistance movement to communism in Eastern Europe. Her proposed involvement proved too difficult to carry out.

Through the Princeton-based Barbara Piasecka Johnson Foundation, Johnson supported Polish students in the United States and humanitarian projects in Poland, among other causes. In recent years she focused on providing help to children and young adults with autism.

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