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Artist's album designs became rock icons

| Thursday, April 18, 2013, 8:24 p.m.
FILE - This July 24, 2008 file photo shows English graphic designer Storm Thorgerson standing next to his album cover artwork for Pink Floyd's 'The Dark Side of the Moon' during the opening of his exhibition 'Mind Over Matter: The Images of Pink Floyd' in London. Storm Thorgerson whose eye-catching Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin album covers captured the spirit of 1970s psychedelia, has died. He was 69. In a statement, Thorgerson’s family said that he died Thursday April 18, 2013 and that “his ending was peaceful and he was surrounded by family and friends.” AP Photo

LONDON — English graphic designer Storm Thorgerson, whose eye-popping album art for Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin encapsulated the spirit of 1970s psychedelia, died on Thursday. He was 69.

In a statement, Thorgerson's family said that his death “was peaceful and he was surrounded by family and friends.” The statement gave few details but said that the artist, who suffered a stroke in 2003, had been ill for some time.

Even those who are not familiar with Thorgerson's name will have seen his work gracing vinyl collections and CD racks. He was best known for his surreal Pink Floyd covers, which guitarist David Gilmour said had long been “an inseparable part of our work.”

Some of Thorgerson's covers — the disturbing image of a burning man in a business suit featured on Pink Floyd's “Wish You Were Here” or the stark prism on the band's “Dark Side of the Moon” — have become icons in their own right.

Thorgerson made covers for Led Zeppelin, Peter Gabriel, Phish, Styx and Muse. His art tended toward the unsettling or the bizarre. His CD front for The Cranberries' “Bury The Hatchet” featured a monstrous, disembodied eye staring at a crouching, naked figure in a desert.

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