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Veteran Republican key in welfare reform

| Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, 6:57 p.m.

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Former U.S. Rep. Clay Shaw, a longtime veteran of Congress who helped then-President Bill Clinton achieve his goal of ending “welfare as we know it,” has died following a lengthy battle with lung cancer.

Shaw's family said in a statement that he passed away on Tuesday in Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale. He was 74.

Shaw spent 26 years in Washington and was among the first in a line of Republicans who helped transform Florida from a state dominated by just one political party into the battleground state that it is today.

He held positions in the city of Fort Lauderdale, including mayor, before riding into office with President Ronald Reagan in 1980. He survived several spirited challenges to his South Florida seat only to finally lose his spot during a Democratic wave in 2006.

One of Shaw's standout moments was his role in sponsoring and helping shepherd in 1996 a contentious bill to reform the nation's safety net known as welfare. The measure put in place time and work requirements on welfare beneficiaries and gave states a much greater say in running the program.

Shaw worked on previous efforts to change the program but that legislation stalled before Republicans won control of Congress in 1994. Clinton, however, twice vetoed welfare overhaul bills, prompting Shaw to complain at one point that the Democratic president had “caved in to the liberal wing of his party.”

Clinton, who was running for re-election at the time, finally signed a third overhaul into law in August 1996 despite criticism from some Democrats that the measure would hurt the nation's poor.

Shaw, right before the bill was passed, said that the “the degree of success that we are going to have is going to be a victory for the American people, for the poor.”

During his lengthy career in Congress, Shaw led an effort to eliminate Social Security earning penalties for working seniors and he pushed through federal legislation to help restore the Everglades.

His political career was finally derailed in 2006 by Ron Klein, who repeatedly criticized Shaw over Medicare, the federal health care program for the elderly.

Shaw was born in Miami and earned degrees, including a law degree, from Stetson University while also earning a MBA from the University of Alabama. He was elected mayor of Fort Lauderdale in 1975.

He is survived by his wife Emilie, four children and 15 grandchildren. He will be buried in Cuba, Ala.

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