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Devout librarian built life around service

| Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, 8:44 p.m.
News obituary for Barbara Anne Rogers, of New Sewickley, Beaver County, who died Monday, Oct. 28, 2013.

Barbara Anne Rogers could not be stumped as the children's librarian in the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh's South Side branch.

“People would say, ‘My mom read this book to me about 30 years ago, and it had a cat with a red tail. What was it?,' and she would figure it out,” said Mrs. Rogers' daughter, Suzanne Moulton, of Park City, Utah.

Barbara Anne Rogers of New Sewickley, Beaver County, died in her home on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, after battling Lewy Body dementia. She was 78.

Moulton said her mother was well-known in the area not only because of her work in the children's library, but through story times around the region, including in Head Start facilities and local schools.

Mrs. Rogers' family said she worked tirelessly to help strengthen the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the area, including leading a stake, comparable to a diocese, that oversaw women in the area. She led the church's Relief Society organization locally for 11 years.

“She will be remembered for kindness and service, any kind of service,” said her husband of 55 years, Clark Rogers. “If anyone needed help, she was there. She either knew answers or resources, for either library patrons or the church.”

For a recent celebration of the Carnegie branch renovation, Rogers said, he took his wife in a wheelchair, where many staff and patrons greeted her warmly. She retired from the library between 10 and 12 years ago, family said.

“Many people said it was wonderful how she taught them when they were 5 years old, or their children, an appreciation for reading,” Rogers said.

In addition to her husband, Clark, and daughter, Suzanne, Mrs. Rogers is survived by: sons Scott Rogers of Economy; Mike Rogers of Manassas, Va.; daughters Debra Biernesser of Chippewa; Carlyn Johnson of Hudson, Ohio; brothers David Giauque of Phoenix; Bill Giauque of Provo, Utah; Bob Giauque of Phoenix; Doug Giauque of Baltimore; 23 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren, with a sixth due in January.

Friends and family will be received from 2 to 4 and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday in Devlin Funeral Home of Cranberry, 2678 Rochester Road, Cranberry. A funeral service will be conducted at 10:30 a.m. Monday in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2771 Rochester Road, Cranberry, with a crypt dedication at 2 p.m. at Sylvania Hills Cemetery in Daugherty, Beaver County.

Bill Vidonic is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-380-5621 or bvidonic@tribweb.com.

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