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Downtown financial analyst stayed 'country boy'

| Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
David L. Watters, 84, of Greensburg, died Sunday, March 16, 2014, at his home.

David Watters commuted every day to Pittsburgh, where he was an accomplished research analyst in the world of finance, but family members said his heart was always in the Greensburg area, where he grew up and lived.

Mr. Watters, a past president of the Pittsburgh Security Traders and the Pittsburgh Stock Clearing Organization, was director of research and executive vice president for Hefren-Tillotson Inc., Downtown, prior to retirement.

David L. Watters of Greensburg died on Sunday, March 16, 2014, at home. He was 84.

“He loved his job, and he loved being in Pittsburgh, but he always was a country boy. He collected friends, and they became his friends for life. He loved being outdoors in nature. And he loved gardening,” said his daughter, Deidre Watters of Lansdowne in Delaware County.

He was born in Jeannette to Iris A. and Anna Gregory Watters. Mr. Watters met his wife of 58 years, Barbara Rose Watters, at Westinghouse in East Pittsburgh.

“In the early days of computing, she was a key punch officer, and he was in data processing,” the couple's daughter said. “He used to intentionally mess up cards so he could go over and flirt with her. It took him four years to get her to go out.”

She said her father maintained interests in art, classical music and history throughout his life.

Kim Fleming, CEO of Hefren-Tillotson, said Mr. Watters had a wonderful, wry sense of humor and stayed in touch with former co-workers when he retired.

“He loved to mentor younger people. He was the kind of person who never stopped learning. He loved the arts. He loved to travel. He loved his wine and knew about it,” she said, adding he'd often stop by the office with gifts of tomatoes and maple syrup from his home.

In addition to his wife, Barbara, and daughter, Deidre, Mr. Watters is survived by two grandchildren. Friends will be received from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday in Coshey-Nicholson Funeral Home, 319 W. Pittsburgh St., Greensburg.

He was preceded in death by a son, David Watters.

A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday in Otterbein United Methodist Church in Greensburg, with the Rev. Sung Chung officiating. Interment will follow in Westmoreland County Memorial Park.

Debra Erdley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-320-7996 or derdley@tribweb.com.

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